Menu

The Facts Hurt

The Facts Hurt

Name:

Institution:

The Facts Hurt

The Facts Hurt policy report was a research conducted by Trust for America’s Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) with a view of investigating injury death rates and rankings in America’s states. For this study, Florida State was chosen for analysis and comparison with other states. Injuries are a cause for concern due to their high mortality rates in among children, adolescents and adults in the United States. According to the report, factors such as seat belt use, licensing requirements, drunk driving, road environment and vehicle design have contributed significantly to these mortality rates (San Diego State University & World Health Organization, 2009). If these factors were taken into consideration, death rates related to such injury would be reduced significantly.

When compared to other states, Florida has a score of six out of ten on steps it took to prevent injuries. Nationally, twenty-one states scored five or below out of ten on the same scale. New York and California were the highest scoring states with a score of nine and Montana States scored lowest rate with two out of ten (San Diego State University & World Health Organization, 2009). When compared to the highest and lowest scoring, Florida ranked above average with a difference of three points between New York and California and a difference of four when compared to Montana. Florida amongst ten other states scored six in the scale. This group was the most populated compared to others.

An analysis of injury related deaths in Florida revealed that this state rated 18th nationally in terms of adult injury related deaths with a rate of 66.8 per 100,000 succumbing to injury. Ultimately, medical costs resulting from fatal injury in Florida amounted to 117.7 million dollars as of January 2013. Nationally, Florida amassed a score of six out of ten in terms of key indicators on steps taken to reduce or prevent injury. Notably, Florida paid attention to include seat belts, use of bicycle helmets, intimate partner violence, concussions, drug abuse and Ecodes.

With a score of six, this implies that Florida did not take four other significant measurers to curb injury related deaths. One measure this state can take to raise its rating involves managing drunk driving. The state can apply mandatory ignition interlocks for citizens convicted of drunk driving. This should also apply to first time offenders. The other measure should involve applying the universal law that requires all motorcyclists to wear helmets. The third measure revolves around booster seats. This requirement should meet AAP standards that maintain a minimum age of eight for booster seats (San Diego State University & World Health Organization, 2009). The final measure Florida should apply is teen dating violence. The state should engage teenagers in seminars and programs teaching on early relationships and their implications. Teenagers in relationships should also be taught on injury related deaths caused by teen dating violence.

Ultimately, these injury-related issues have affected many people in the United States including myself. I recently had to comprehend the death of my cousin Trevor from a vehicle accident. Trevor died aged 22 when the vehicle he was traveling on along with two friends rammed head on into a truck. When investigations were, Trevor was the only one in the vehicle who had not buckled his seat belt. His other two friends survived. I was very much affected psychologically by the demise of my cousin and learned that traffics laws are in their best interests designed to save lives.

References

San Diego State University & World Health Organization. (2009). SafetyLit: Injury prevention literature. San Diego, CA: San Diego State University, Center for Injury Prevention Policy and Practice.

0 Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *