Menu

Organizational Communication

Organizational Communication

Name:

Course:

Institution:

Tutor:

Date:

Organizational Communication

Paragraphing, which involves a set of sentences and words that relate to a similar subject should be considered as important as the wording because they determine the effectiveness of the words to the reader. Most readers are usually in a rush to known the general idea of the content once they make an encounter with the first book. Other readers might not have the patience to finish a book to the last page once they have started reading it (Lindsay 2011). This means the form of paragraph arrangement is a lot more effective in this case.

For example, a reader might reject a certain book because of failing to have an introductory paragraph since he might want to get general information about the book. Another case is whereby the first paragraph contains dull content that makes the reader uninterested or uninspired to continue reading the book. Therefore, if the writer follows an arrangement, in which the first paragraph has captivating content, most readers would want to finish reading the whole book because of the formed curiosity of wanting to know more about the interesting content.

In addition, the words fail to count as much since if their appeal is not reflected in the first paragraph, they will not be effective to the reader once he refuses to read the complete book. Paragraphing is also very significant because it helps in arranging words in a logical order in order to convey some meaning to the reader. For example, the process of paragraphing helps in avoiding errors such as repetition of words that might occur due to confusion if the words are not arranged in a certain manner (Allison 1996). Paragraphing arranges several words according to various criteria such as referencing, order of topic dissimilation and verb agreement and hence enable the words give a particular sentence meaning.

Paragraphing is also considered as effective as the words because it helps in arranging the author’s concepts and ideas in an organized and hence articulates the words in a way that is comprehendible to the reader (Naomi 2007). For example, paragraphing involves criteria such as the introductory paragraph, body and the conclusion. This criterion guides the reader’s understanding of the content to follow the order of events as described by the author.

Reference

Lindsay, David. Scientific Writing = Thinking in Words. Melbourne: CSIRO Publishing, 2011. Print.

Lonsdale, Allison B. Teaching Translation from Spanish to English: Worlds Beyond Words. Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press, 1996. Print.

Wolfe, Naomi A. Tennessee Gateway High School Exit Exam in English Language Arts. Hauppauge, N.Y: Barron’s Educational Series, 2007. Print.

0 Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *