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Giving Birth Control Devices to Teenagers

Giving Birth Control Devices to Teenagers “The best contraceptive is the word no – repeated frequently. ”  ~Margaret Smith There is a big debate on whether or not birth control devices should be given to teenagers. Both sides of this argument have valid points but society needs to be realistic to the facts that the age of teenagers becoming sexually active is at an early age. Society also needs to realize unwanted pregnancy rate is the highest in the United States.

Of course parents of teenagers would love to think their teenagers will come to them to talk about sex, the reality is, not all teenagers feel comfortable discussing this issue with their parents. Although teaching teenagers about sex is very important and abstinence is the best way of prevent unwanted pregnancy, teenagers are still becoming pregnant. Like it or not, teenagers are engaging in sex. So with the increase in teenage pregnancy and the age of teenagers becoming sexually active, who do we rely on to teach the teenagers about sexual intercourse and preventing pregnancy?

Someone needs to teach them. Most parents want to believe they have a great relationship with their teenagers. Parents also want to believe their teenagers will talk to them about anything, including sex. Many teenagers say it’s easier to talk about sensitive subjects, like sex, with friends, rather than adults. And who would blame them? Many teenagers do not think their parents will understand. We have all felt this way at some point in our lives. It’s human instinct, especially a teenager’s instinct, to go straight friends when you need advice.

By doing this, teenagers might be missing out on some important info — not to mention guidance and support — when they overlook their parents. The reality is, teenagers do not always talk to their parents, so society needs to have other options for teenagers to learn about sexual intercourse and prevention of unwanted pregnancy. In a study on parent-child talks about sex and sexuality, researchers have found that 40% of teenagers have engaged in sexual intercourse before talking to their parents about sex.

Parents are not always comfortable about talking about sex to their teenagers and teenagers do not feel comfortable about talking sex with their parents. Parents may also think if they put their teenagers on birth control, this will give them permission to go out and have sex. This is where communication is most important between parents and teenagers. This may also be a reason parents are not willing to help their teenagers get on birth control. Is not giving your teenager birth control going to prevent them from having sex?

The reality is no. There need to be other options for teenagers to be able to get birth control without their parents knowledge or permission. Even though parents want to know if their teenagers in thinking about becoming sexually active and discuss birth control options with them, many do not believe their teenagers are thinking about becoming sexually active at the age of 13. If parents have the “sex talk” with their teenagers, they are probably not thinking of discussing the topic at that early of an age.

It’s realistic to say teenagers are becoming sexually active at an earlier age. 46. 8% of all high school students report they have had sexual intercourse. Studies also show this has decreases 13. 3% between the years of1991-2005. Of those surveyed, 6. 2% of high school students have had sexual intercourse for the first time before they were 13. With teenagers becoming sexually active at an earlier age, this is all the more reason for birth control to be given to teenagers along with the instruction of how to properly use them.

Do you really think a 13 year old will discuss sex with a parent? Chances are not. It is also proven that youth exposed to sex on television were more likely to over stimulate the frequency of sexual activity among peers and more likely to have a more permissive attitude towards sex. Sex is prevalent everywhere. Teenagers are not mature enough to distinguish fantasy from reality and they think they are invincible. Teenagers believe getting pregnant will not happen to them. They rely on advice given by their friends instead of getting information from a reliable source.

Sex education along with the proper use of birth control needs to be taught to our teens, whether is be from parents or schools. Even though we would love teenagers not to engage in sex, the chances of them having sex are increasing. The most important reason teenagers need to given birth control is the pregnancy rate is highest in the United States of the entire world. Do you think if teenagers where given birth control devices this would become lower? Unmarried teenagers having children account for 24% of all unmarried expectant mothers.

We all know that rate is too high and we need to do something to lower it. Becoming a parent is hard enough, but when you become a teenage parent, that is even harder. There are many obstacles a teenager runs into becoming a parent. Teenagers who become pregnant are less likely to finish high school let alone go to college. Also, when a teen girl becomes pregnant, she may be less likely to get the proper medical care needed during her pregnancy. She may hide the fact that she is pregnant or be in denial.

This could increase the risk of low birth rate and complication for both mother and baby. Babies born to teenagers are at a greater risk of abuse or neglect. Young mothers are uncertain about their roles and may be frustrated by the constant demands of taking care of a baby. Teenagers are more likely to live in poverty or live on welfare. Billions of dollars are spent on teenage mothers and their children. Do you think we should be using some of that money to be teaching about birth control and how to properly use them?

Teenagers need to be given birth control and instructions on how to properly use the birth control to help to lower the high pregnancy rate in the United States. School classes in family life and sexual education, as well as clinics providing reproductive information and birth control to young people, can also help to prevent an unwanted pregnancy. So you can see that even though parents want and should be the ones to teach and provide birth control to their teens, not all teens want to discuss sex with their parents.

Teenagers should have different educational classes to teach them about sexual intercourse, birth control and the proper use of birth control. Teenagers should be provided birth control for two main reasons. One is that that average age of when teenagers are becoming sexual active is at a low age. The other reason would be that the United States has the highest rate of teenage pregnancy in the world and we need to do something to lower it. So the question is, do we rely on the teenagers to just say no, again and again and again, or do we take a proactive stance on trying to prevent teenage pregnancy?

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